FROM:   THE INTERPRETER’S DESK

               LEE PAVLOT, RULES INTERPRETER, NYS BOARD 19

TO:          ALL BOARD MEMBERS

I have put together a memo listing the most commonly missed signals and mechanics, and a reminder of the Official’s duties before the game and during the game.  Many of the items I have pointed out have been noted by IAABO Supervisor of Interpreter’s, Peter Webb.  During his travels around different states and after attending many state tournaments he has noted that many basic IAABO signals and mechanics are not followed.  

As we know many officials on our boards work men’s and women’s college games, as well as girls’ high school games. Officials have to be cognizant of the level of the game they are officiating and use the appropriate signals and mechanics. When officiating boys’ high school games, the officials must use approved IAABO signals and mechanics, all of which are outlined in the IAABO rule book and manual. 

Several interpreters asked if they could be given the list. Following is a guide that may be useful for officials to follow when doing boys’ high school basketball games. The original list was geared toward the three-man crews. The following has been modified from the original tournament list so that it applies to the normal two-person crews.  

On floor pre-game:   

       Be aware of players dunking—this is a technical foul situation.

       Check players with compression sleeves.  Beginning with the 2011 season the only colors allowed are solid white, black, beige or a single solid school color.  All team members wearing sleeves must have the same color sleeve.  Compression sleeves can only be worn for a medical purpose.

       Check taped arms and hands for hard objects (splints, etc.)

       Only arm bands and head bands of the proper color should be allowed. The proper colors are solid white, black, beige or a single solid school color and shall be the same color for each item and for all participants of that team.

       Verify with the coaches that their players are legally equipped and that they are aware of the sportsmanship rule (Rule 2-4-5).  Also, be sure to identify the coach’s area and line.

Game mechanics:

       Foul calls--Stop the clock with fist extended in the air while sounding whistle.  At the site of the foul identify the player committing the foul, player’s number, jersey color, goal counts if made and then identify the shooter and number of shots or location of throw-in.  Next, proceed to the reporting area and give the information to the table. Always go to the reporting area, not the side line, not the foul circle, but the reporting area.  Use only one hand to give the numbers of the player committing the foul. 

       Be careful of double whistles, make eye contact with the other official to avoid a conflict on the call, to prevent a double foul (blarge) call.

       Three-man crew–switch on all fouls with the calling official going opposite the table.  Don’t switch if the calling official is already in the “C” opposite the table.   In high school you do switch on long calls, different than college.

       Free throw administration:   Be aware of free-throw violations.  In boys’ high school, players may not enter the lane until the ball touches the basket or the backboard. 

       Violation calls and out of bounds calls:  First, arm straight up with open hand extended while sounding whistle to stop the clock.  Then indicate the violation or the direction for out of bounds.  Give the proper signal for the violation or the direction for the team making the throw-in.  Do not turn your back on the players or signal as you are running down the court.  Indicate the color of the jersey of the throw-in team, the spot of the throw-in and the direction of that team’s basket.  Be sure to make the throw-in spot at the proper place, closest to the spot of the violation or at the location the ball went out of bounds.  Be careful of double whistles, make good eye contact to avoid a conflict on the call.  In held ball situations, stop the clock first by signaling with thumbs.  Check the arrow for direction, then complete signals in the direction of the arrow.

       Timeout calls:  Be sure that the calling team has possession of the ball.  During routine playing time, a player must be in player control to get the timeout.   When there is a scramble on the floor be sure the player has control of the ball before you award the timeout.

Timeout positions:

       60-second: The administering official standing on the division line on the far side of the center circle facing the table and the other official at the throw-in spot or the foul line if a foul shot follows.

       30-second: The administering official standing on the division line on the table side of the center circle and the other official at the throw-in spot or at the foul line if foul shots follow the timeout.

       Technical fouls:   If you have a technical foul situation, work together.  If a hostile situation has developed, the calling official should make his call and get to the opposite side as quickly as possible.  The other official should come up to the table area to handle the situation.  Get the substitute in, administer the shots and get the game going.

       Don’t let games get too rough or out of control.  When played by the rules, each team has the same opportunity to be the winning team.

       As you know in officiating everyone in the crowd thinks they are a better official than you.  They can see better and as we all know, they can make better calls than all of us. However, you are a professional--you are the expert in your field.  Always act like a professional and exhibit confidence and control.  With that in mind, always exhibit correct mechanics and administer the rules correctly.     Do your best and have a good game.

(For a printable version of this memo, click the icon below)

 NFHS NYS RULES MODIFICATIONS

     SHOT CLOCK

  • 35 – second shot clock: Will be used for varsity and junior varsity levels only.
  • The shot clock will be reset to 35 seconds when one team fouls, a live ball (inbounds) lodges between the backboard and ring or comes to rest on the flange, or if a try, or tap hits the ring.
  • The shot clock will get reset to 15 seconds if there is14 seconds or less and a defensive player intentionally kicks the ball or intentionally leaves the court. The penalty for intentionally leaving the court is a violation and a throw-in awarded to the offended team at the spot of the violation. The officials will signal the numbers “one” (using the index finger on the right hand) and “five” (using the four fingers and thumb on the left hand) alerting the shot clock operator to set the shot clock to 15 seconds when it is at 14 seconds or less.
  • The shot clock will not get reset if there is 15 seconds or more and a defensive player intentionally kicks the ball or intentionally leaves the court. The penalty for intentionally leaving the court is a violation and a throw-in awarded to the offended team at the spot of the violation.
  • The shot clock will not get reset when a double foul occurs and one team is in control of the ball. Play shall be resumed by a throw-in to the team that was in control at the spot nearest to where the ball was located when the stoppage occurred.
  • During team control, the shot clock will not get reset if a defensive player causes a held ball and the alternating possession arrow favors the offensive team.
  • If one shot clock is not working, play the game with the remaining shot clock.
  • If neither shot clock is working, play the game with a timing device at the table.
  • If there is no timing device at the table, ask the coaches if they want to play the game without a shot clock. If one or both coaches do not want to play without a shot clock, no game will be played.

TIME OUTFour – 60-second time-outs: Can be used anytime during the game including any overtime period(s)

      Two – 30-second time-outs: Only one 30-second time out may be used during the first half. Only one 30-second time out may be used during the second half or overtime period(s).

COACHING BOX

The coaching box will be from the nearer end line up to the 28-foot hash mark. It will also include the area immediately in front and behind the team bench. The head coach maintains coaching box privileges for the entire game.

ENTANGLED NET

If the net gets entangled during the course of play, allow play to continue until there is an opportunity to have the net attended to (e.g. dead ball period).

UNIFORMS

The home team is required to wear white jerseys and the visiting team is required to wear dark jerseys. This part of the uniform rule applies to the varsity level only.

(For a printable version of this memo click on the icon below)

 

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